Foundation announces
2018 postgraduate
research grantees


The Asia New Zealand Foundation is pleased to announce the recipients of the Foundation’s postgraduate research grants. They are Dylan Stent, Jasmine Edwards, and Jack Petterson.

“Congratulations Dylan, Jasmine and Jack for their selection for this year’s round of grants,” says Pip Mclachlan, the Foundation’s director of research and engagement.

“The Foundation is keen to get more young scholars to ‘Think Asia’ when it comes to their choice of future academic and career options – and we do this by providing them with opportunities to grow their knowledge, confidence, and connections with Asia,” says Pip.

The postgraduate research grants are part of the Foundation’s ‘Think Asia’ programme, a pathway to better equip young New Zealanders with Asia-related knowledge and skills as they go through the education system and on to early employment.

Dylan Stent

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Dylan is researching the competing visions of national identity in South Korea as drivers for South Korean foreign policy

Dylan is a PhD candidate at Victoria University of Wellington. He is researching the competing visions of national identity in South Korea as drivers for South Korean foreign policy. One of the major aspects of this research is identifying what is means to be Korean.

Dylan is closely involved in the ethnic Korean community in New Zealand, particularly the Kimchi Club (a network of young Kowi (Korean Kiwi) and Kiwi professionals in Wellington). His research project will deepen New Zealanders’ understanding of South Korean national identity, and also how Korean New Zealanders view themselves. The grant will assist with Dylan’s travel expenses to Korea to conduct interviews with academics, officials and politicians, as well as conducting other primary source data gathering.

Jasmine Edwards

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Jasmine's research is on the impacts of aid investment in dairy development in Sri Lanka

Jasmine is a Masters student in Development Studies at Victoria University of Wellington. Her research project is focused on understanding the impacts of aid investment in dairy development in Sri Lanka – looking at the New Zealand Government’s aid programme relating to dairy development initiatives to help increase production and productivity.

Jasmine’s research will take place in Jaffna, northern Sri Lanka, where she will conduct an in-depth set of qualitative case studies and interviews to address local farmers’ perceptions of the social and environmental impacts of dairy development initiatives, and how they exercise influence over managing those issues.

Jack Petterson

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Jack’s research examines China's naval militarization of the South China Sea

Jack is pursuing his Masters in International Studies at the University of Otago. He’s had an interest in China and Chinese foreign policy throughout his studies, which included learning Mandarin. Jack’s research examines China's naval militarization of the South China Sea, and theories of international relations that can be applied to help explain China's behaviour in the region. Jack will use his grant to conduct fieldwork in Beijing, Nanjing and Shanghai, where he will interview scholars and officials to gain a more rounded and holistic perspective on the issues.  

The Foundation offers three $5000 grants each year to support recipients’ travel expenses and fieldwork for their postgraduate research. The Foundation’s aim is to encourage postgraduate students to ‘Think Asia’ when selecting their research topics – in particular, to consider research on matters relating to Asia and New Zealand – particularly in international relations, international law and trade/economics.

For more information on the postgraduate research grants for 2019, please contact James To (Senior Adviser, Research and Engagement) [email protected]